Rediscovering the stories of the wounded – The Battle of Naseby, 1645

The battle of Naseby finally destroyed the field army of the King and in two hours changed the history not only of Britain, but every modern democracy.

We know that about 1000 Royalists were killed and a further 5000 were marched off to captivity. However, like most battles prior to the modern era, the fate of the wounded of both sides has been a mystery.

Now the researchers from the Civil War Petitions Project have revealed the stories of some of the wounded survivors of Naseby. The project’s Principal Investigator Andrew Hopper, Professor of Local and Social History at the University of Oxford tells Publisher, Mike Gibbs about their lives after the battle.

Listen here

Also available on

The World Turned Upside Down - The British Civil Wars 1638-1651
The World Turned Upside Down - The British Civil Wars 1638-1651
Rediscovering the stories of the wounded - The Battle of Naseby, 1645
/

Listen here

The World Turned Upside Down - The British Civil Wars 1638-1651
The World Turned Upside Down - The British Civil Wars 1638-1651
Rediscovering the stories of the wounded - The Battle of Naseby, 1645
/

Also available on

bio copy 3

Contributor

Andrew Hopper

Andrew Hopper

Professor of Local and Social History

Andrew Hopper is Professor of Local and Social History in the Department for Continuing Education at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Kellogg College. He…

Read Biography

Learn more

glossary copy 7

Interactive Glossary

reading

Reading

maps

Maps

place

Places

maps

Sources

calendar

Timeline

link copy

Links

maps copy 3

Sources

John Rushworth, Historical Collections of Private Passages of State (London, 1722)www.british-history.ac.uk/rushworth-papers/
Joshua Sprigge, Anglia Rediviva (London, 1647)quod.lib.umich.edu