Was Cromwell’s inability to work with Parliament the greatest irony of the English Revolution?

In this occasional series, distinguished academic historians of the 17th century are invited to discuss some of the controversial questions which regularly arise in lectures, publications and exams.

Oliver Cromwell’s actions, decisions and response to the world in which he had to operate had consequences which shaped the history of Britain and the world beyond. The outcomes were often controversial and have been debated by historians ever since.

In this programme David L. Smith, Fellow and Director of Studies in History, Selwyn College, Cambridge asks:

“Was Oliver Cromwell’s inability to work with Parliament the greatest irony of the English Revolution?”

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Was Cromwell's inability to work with Parliament the greatest irony of the English Revolution?
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Contributor

David L Smith

Fellow and Director of Studies in History, Selwyn College Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of History

I read History at Selwyn College, Cambridge, and then went on to do a PhD under John Morrill’s supervision. I became a Research Fellow of Selwyn in…

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