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Historians now recognise that the civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century must be viewed in a British and Irish context and not exclusively from an English perspective.

Ireland, Religion, Scotland, Series, Talks

To unravel this historiography Contributing Editor, Professor Andrew Hopper, sat down with Dr Stephen Roberts, the distinguished Emeritus Editor of The History of Parliament.

Academic, Interviews

John Pym, who was born in 1584 and died in December 1643, was one of the most important Parliamentary figures in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Civil Wars.

1640, 1641, 1642, Charles I, Interviews

Oliver Cromwell’s actions, decisions and response to the world in which he had to operate had consequences which shaped the history of Britain and the world beyond.

Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Talks, Teachers

Oliver Cromwell’s actions, decisions and response to the world in which he had to operate had consequences which shaped the history of Britain and the world beyond.

1658, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Restoration, Series, Teachers

There is no more iconic or controversial figure in Britain during the first half of the 17th Century than Oliver Cromwell.

Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series, Teachers

By New Year’s Day 1660, the Republican experiment in Britain was almost at an end and the country appeared to be drifting towards anarchy.

1660, Restoration, Series, Talks

1642 was a tempestuous year beginning on 4th January with the unsuccessful attempt by the King to arrest Five Members of Parliament.

1642, Causes of Civil War, Series, Talks

Many controversies swirl around the legacy of Oliver Cromwell and over the centuries it has become increasingly difficult to separate fact from fiction.

Interviews, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell

Edward Sexby, a comrade-in-arms of Oliver Cromwell who became his implacable enemy.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Oliver Cromwell, who chaired most of the Putney Debates,  took a different approach to that of his son in law, Henry Ireton, who confronted the radicals head-on and tried to undermines their arguments.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Henry Ireton was the eloquent spokesperson for the Grandees of the New Model Army who sided with his father-in-law Oliver Cromwell.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Thomas Rainborowe was the romantic rallying point of the radicals during the debates.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

John Wildman was one of most active members of the group of radical Levellers who argued for democratic, republican government in the Putney Debates of 1647.  He was one of the most enigmatic and fasinating figure whose life spanned two revolutions and a bewildering range of political alliances.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

By the summer of 1647, Parliament had won the First Civil War. At the battles of Naseby and Langport, the New Model Army had crushed the Royalist field armies and the King himself was now their prisoner. But all was not well on the parliamentary side.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

A concise introduction to the causes and consequences of the religious divisions which contributed to the outbreak of the Civil Wars.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

The Tudor Reformation of the 16th Century left England, Scotland and Ireland bitterly divided.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

Religious divisions inflamed by King Chares I were an important cause of the wars and were exacerbated by significant differences between the Three Kingdoms.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

After the Regicide, religious fragmentation particularly within the army, made Britain difficult to govern and ultimately contributed to the downfall of the republic.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

The proceedings played out in front of thousands of spectators within Westminster Hall and in print were read by many more. The Rump Parliament intended the trial to serve propaganda purposes. However, this aim was subverted by the king’s surprisingly fluent defence in which he recast himself as a defender of the people’s liberty in the face of a new, arbitrary power.

1649, Charles I, Key Questions, Series, Talks

The British Civil Wars provides an exciting opportunity to engage learners of all ages and as Denise Greany, Learning Officer at National Civil War Centre explains, it brings compelling stories with a diverse and colourful cast of characters to the classroom

Education, National Civil War Centre, Teachers, Video

The battle of Naseby finally destroyed the field army of the King and in two hours changed the history not only of Britain, but every modern democracy.

1645, Battles, Civil War Petitions Project, Interviews, Military Medicine

Discover the momentous event that occurred at Naseby, which was to shape history - not only of Britain but every modern democracy.

1645, Charles I, English Civil Wars, Interviews, Military History, Oliver Cromwell

It is often said that there was nothing 'civil' about the British Civil Wars. This was not the story of dashing Cavaliers and God-fearing Roundheads fighting battles in fields far from the civilian population.

Civil War Petitions Project, English Civil Wars, Interviews

“Turncoat!” The word creates immediate images of traitors, renegades and defectors… here is a person who places self-interest above the well-being or safety of comrades-in-arms, and so switches sides irrespective of the resulting harm it does to the Cause.

English Civil Wars, Interviews, Royalists

Discover the stories of ordinary people preserved in more than 4000 petitions. Professor Andrew Hopper introduces this window in to what the conflict meant for them.

Civil War Petitions Project, English Civil Wars, Interviews

The Civil Wars changed the lives of families all across the British Isles, and inevitably children became involved not only as passive bystanders, but also as child soldiers.

English Civil Wars, Interviews

In this interview, Dr. Ismini Pells reveals that PTSD in veterans is not a new problem. She discusses the psychological impact that can be seen in the men who fought in the Civil Wars.

Civil War Petitions Project, English Civil Wars, Features, Interviews, Mental Health, Military Medicine

In this talk Professor Vallance asks whether his condemnation and death were the pre-determined outcome of his trial.

1649, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Second Civil War, Talks, Teachers

This podcast discusses the range of factors which caused the defeat of the royalists in England and Wales during the First Civil War of 1642-1646.

Charles I, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Royalists, Talks, Teachers

While many potential causes of the British Civil Wars have been identified, in this talk Professor Vallance focuses on the degree to which the king himself was responsible.

1640, 1641, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Talks

Events which affected the course of British history are revealed in the “History of Parliament” Project.

English Civil Wars, Interviews

The origins and causes of the British civil wars have been the source of debate among historians.

Academic, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Talks, Teachers

The Regicide was followed by a period of political upheaval and constitutional change.

1649, 1660, Academic, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Talks, Teachers

How were the British Civil Wars fought and why did they end with the Royalist defeat and the execution of the King?

1642, 1649, Academic, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Second Civil War, Talks, Teachers

What were the origins of the British Civil Wars?

1642, Academic, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Talks, Teachers