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1647 was the first year of peace after Parliament’s victory in the First Civil War.

1647, Coming soon, Series, Talks

In January 1644, the Scottish army was sent into England to directly intervene in the Civil War in Parliament’s favour. The Scots became aligned with the Presbyterians at Westminster, where they generated the political ideas which shaped much of the war effort.

Ireland, Religion, Scotland, Series, Talks

From 1637 popular opposition to Charles I in Scotland ignited a crisis which first spread to Ireland in 1641 and then to England and Wales in 1642.

Ireland, Religion, Scotland, Series, Talks

Historians now recognise that the civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century must be viewed in a British and Irish context and not exclusively from an English perspective.

Ireland, Religion, Scotland, Series, Talks

To unravel this historiography Contributing Editor, Professor Andrew Hopper, sat down with Dr Stephen Roberts, the distinguished Emeritus Editor of The History of Parliament.

Academic, Interviews

John Pym, who was born in 1584 and died in December 1643, was one of the most important Parliamentary figures in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Civil Wars.

1640, 1641, 1642, Charles I, Interviews

There is no more iconic or controversial figure in Britain during the first half of the 17th Century than Oliver Cromwell.

Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series, Teachers

1642 was a tempestuous year beginning on 4th January with the unsuccessful attempt by the King to arrest five members of Parliament.

1642, Causes of Civil War, Series, Talks

A concise introduction to the causes and consequences of the religious divisions which contributed to the outbreak of the Civil Wars.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

The Tudor reformation of the 16th Century left England, Scotland and Ireland bitterly divided.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

Religious divisions inflamed by King Chares I were an important cause of the wars and were exacerbated by significant differences between the Three Kingdoms.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

After the Regicide, religious fragmentation particularly within the army, made Britain difficult to govern and ultimately contributed to the downfall of the republic.

Interviews, Key Questions, Religion, Teachers

The proceedings played out in front of thousands of spectators within Westminster Hall and in print were read by many more. The Rump Parliament intended the trial to serve propaganda purposes. However, this aim was subverted by the king’s surprisingly fluent defence in which he recast himself as a defender of the people’s liberty in the face of a new, arbitrary power.

1649, Charles I, Key Questions, Series, Talks

“Turncoat!” The word creates immediate images of traitors, renegades and defectors… here is a person who places self-interest above the well-being or safety of comrades-in-arms, and so switches sides irrespective of the resulting harm it does to the Cause.

English Civil Wars, Interviews, Royalists

In this talk Professor Vallance asks whether his condemnation and death were the pre-determined outcome of his trial.

1649, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Second Civil War, Talks, Teachers

While many potential causes of the British Civil Wars have been identified, in this talk Professor Vallance focuses on the degree to which the king himself was responsible.

1640, 1641, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Talks

The origins and causes of the British civil wars have been the source of debate among historians.

Academic, Charles I, Education, English Civil Wars, Key Questions, Talks, Teachers