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Could the Commonwealth and the subsequent Protectorate have survived after the death of Oliver Cromwell on 3rd September 1658, or was it doomed to failure from the beginning?

Interviews, Ireland, Key Questions, Series, Teachers

Sergeant-Major General Phillip Skippon was described as “… the type of man found in the best British armies throughout the centuries”.

Battles, Military History, Talks

Ask who was the Parliamentary general who created the New Model Army was and the most likely answer will be “Oliver Cromwell”. But in fact, it was Sir Thomas Fairfax.

Battles, Interviews, Military History

Napoleon Bonaparte famously said “Soldiers generally win battles, generals get credit for them”.  This is certainly true of many of the histories of the British Civil Wars.

Battles, Interviews, Military History, Series

This is the incredible but true story of John Poyer of Pembroke.

Books, Interviews, Oliver Cromwell, Second Civil War, Wales

Between 1643 and 1645, Basing House in Hampshire – which once rivalled Hampton Court in size and opulence – was besieged by Parliament’s forces.

Battles, Books, Education, Interviews, Teachers

The British Civil Wars are often referred to as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland, which ignores the Welsh experience.

Interviews, Series, Wales

Oliver Cromwell’s actions, decisions and response to the world in which he had to operate had consequences which shaped the history of Britain and the world beyond.

Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Talks, Teachers

Oliver Cromwell’s actions, decisions and response to the world in which he had to operate had consequences which shaped the history of Britain and the world beyond.

1658, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Restoration, Series, Teachers

There is no more iconic or controversial figure in Britain during the first half of the 17th Century than Oliver Cromwell.

Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series, Teachers

Many controversies swirl around the legacy of Oliver Cromwell and over the centuries it has become increasingly difficult to separate fact from fiction.

Interviews, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell

Edward Sexby, a comrade-in-arms of Oliver Cromwell who became his implacable enemy.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Oliver Cromwell, who chaired most of the Putney Debates,  took a different approach to that of his son in law, Henry Ireton, who confronted the radicals head-on and tried to undermines their arguments.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Henry Ireton was the eloquent spokesperson for the Grandees of the New Model Army who sided with his father-in-law Oliver Cromwell.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

Thomas Rainborowe was the romantic rallying point of the radicals during the debates.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

John Wildman was one of most active members of the group of radical Levellers who argued for democratic, republican government in the Putney Debates of 1647.  He was one of the most enigmatic and fasinating figure whose life spanned two revolutions and a bewildering range of political alliances.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

By the summer of 1647, Parliament had won the First Civil War. At the battles of Naseby and Langport, the New Model Army had crushed the Royalist field armies and the King himself was now their prisoner. But all was not well on the parliamentary side.

1647, Education, Key Questions, Oliver Cromwell, Series

The battle of Naseby finally destroyed the field army of the King and in two hours changed the history not only of Britain, but every modern democracy.

1645, Battles, Civil War Petitions Project, Interviews, Military Medicine