People, events and ideas of the British Civil Wars explored and explained by leading historians

A unique FREE OPEN ACCESS resource for everyone interested in this time which shaped the Britain we know today

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What you will find with each programme ·  Podcasts   ·  Transcripts   ·  Interactive glossary   ·  Timeline   ·  Further reading   ·  Maps

The Critical Years

Distinguished historians looking at events and individuals – famous and unknown – in the key years before, during and following the civil wars in Britain and Ireland.

Charles I – The road to execution

Charles I – The road to execution

How culpable was Charles I in causing the British Civil Wars? Why did his army lose and why was he executed? Answering these questions are two noted historians, Edward Vallance and Andrew Hopper.

Religion in the Civil Wars explained

Religious divisions between the three kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland were a fundamental cause of the Civil Wars and throughout the Interregnum sectarianism between Protestant factions constantly challenged the republican government and ultimately destroyed it.

The Men Who Fought the British Civil Wars

In this series leading historians of the civil wars in Britain and Ireland look beyond the famous generals to explore he lives of the men who fought in the ranks and who were drawn from every corner of the three kingdoms.

Step-by-step Guide - Understanding the Civil Wars

Step-by-step Guide – Understanding the Civil Wars

An introductory step-by-step guide to the causes, conflicts and consequences of the British Civil Wars. With Professor Peter Gaunt in three 30-minute podcasts.

‘Black Tom’ – Sir Thomas Fairfax, Creator and Commander of the New Model Army

Ask who was the Parliamentary general who created the New Model Army was and the most likely answer will be “Oliver Cromwell”. But in fact, it was Sir Thomas Fairfax.

Uncovering a ‘forgotten’ massacre at Shelford House

Distinguished Civil War historian David J. Appleby has uncovered the story of this massacre and subsequent cover-up.

Beyond England’s Borders

Historians now recognise that the civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century must be viewed in a British and Irish context and not exclusively from an English perspective.

English Civil Wars

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Were the Commonwealth and the Protectorate doomed from the start?

Could the Commonwealth and the subsequent Protectorate have survived after the death of Oliver Cromwell on 3rd September 1658, or was it doomed to failure from the beginning?

The bloodiest battle – Marston Moor (2nd July 1644)

By 1644, the Civil War was entering its third year and the intervention of a Scots Army of 20,000 men dramatically now changed the balance of power in Parliament’s favour.

Yorkshire in the Civil Wars – A bloody stategic battleground

This programme shines a light on the significant role played by Yorkshire in Parliament’s victory during the Civil Wars. 

Uncovering a ‘forgotten’ massacre at Shelford House

Distinguished Civil War historian David J. Appleby has uncovered the story of this massacre and subsequent cover-up.

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